Posts tagged weird fiction

Monstrous Outlines!

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Before we get to the actual announcement, Migraineers, we’d like you to take a look at this moth. It’s called a Metalmark Moth, of the genus Brenthia in the family Choreutidae. And what this critter does is very rare: they mimic the Jumping Spider, which is (wait for it) their main predator. From the markings, to the way they move, their whole defensive schtick is about making the things that hunt them believe that they are them.

Watching this moth, as we’ve watched and researched so many other examples of mimicry in nature as we’ve been putting together the Monstrous Outlines anthology, we wonder about ourselves. After all, homo sapien sapiens are the possibly the world’s best predator (or at least the most soulful, as Father John Misty tells us and affirms!)… are we camouflaging ourselves as something worse? Something higher up the food chain, maybe? POINTS TO PONDER!

And while you do, ponder this Table of Contents for Monstrous Outlines… with the dual exceptions of authors Cody Goodfellow and Jonathan Raab (each with stories in the 2017 anthology A Breath from the Sky) this is an all new line-up of incredibly talented writers that we know you’ll be thrilled by! (Oh, and that Blackwood fellow, of course. Algie’s The Willows will be in there as well, as the seed story from the heady days of classic weird fiction.)

The Willows — Algernon Blackwood
Restoration — Holly Lyn Walrath
His Little Heart, Dispossessed
— Ben Blattberg
Asleep in the Deep End
— Cody Goodfellow
A Monster Story — Evan Marcroft
Lux Aeterna — David H. Varley
The Mountain’s Wife
— Jennifer R. Donohue
The Agnostic Gospels:
Variations on a Theme
— Rachel Rodman
Like Glory — Joanne Rixon
White Elephant — Rachel Weist
Continuing Ed — Michael Gray Baughan
Core Rules — Jonathan Raab
The Gate, The Key; His Peacock Tongue
— James B. Pepe
Crypsis — Dakota Crane
The Disappearing Apprentice
— Nathan Alling Long

We’ll be keeping you updated over the next few months as the book nears completion, Migraineers! The theme of the anthology may be weird camouflage horror, but we here at MMP HQ are up-front about our intent with Monstrous Outlines… we expect you’ll love it. More to come, so stay connected with Martian Migraine Press on Twitter and Facebook.

Monstrous Outlines Table of Contents!

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Before we get to the actual announcement, Migraineers, we’d like you to take a look at this moth. It’s called a Metalmark Moth, of the genus Brenthia in the family Choreutidae. And what this critter does is very rare: they mimic the Jumping Spider, which is (wait for it) their main predator. From the markings, to the way they move, their whole defensive schtick is about making the things that hunt them believe that they are them.

Watching this moth, as we’ve watched and researched so many other examples of mimicry in nature as we’ve been putting together the Monstrous Outlines anthology, we wonder about ourselves. After all, homo sapien sapiens are the possibly the world’s best predator (or at least the most soulful, as Father John Misty tells us and affirms!)… are we camouflaging ourselves as something worse? Something higher up the food chain, maybe? POINTS TO PONDER!

And while you do, ponder this Table of Contents for Monstrous Outlines… with the dual exceptions of authors Cody Goodfellow and Jonathan Raab (each with stories in the 2017 anthology A Breath from the Sky) this is an all new line-up of incredibly talented writers that we know you’ll be thrilled by! (Oh, and that Blackwood fellow, of course. Algie’s The Willows will be in there as well, as the seed story from the heady days of classic weird fiction.)

The Willows — Algernon Blackwood
Restoration — Holly Lyn Walrath
His Little Heart, Dispossessed
— Ben Blattberg
Asleep in the Deep End
— Cody Goodfellow
A Monster Story — Evan Marcroft
Lux Aeterna — David H. Varley
The Mountain’s Wife
— Jennifer R. Donohue
The Agnostic Gospels:
Variations on a Theme
— Rachel Rodman
Like Glory — Joanne Rixon
White Elephant — Rachel Weist
Continuing Ed — Michael Gray Baughan
Core Rules — Jonathan Raab
The Gate, The Key; His Peacock Tongue
— James B. Pepe
Crypsis — Dakota Crane
The Disappearing Apprentice
— Nathan Alling Long

We’ll be keeping you updated over the next few months as the book nears completion, Migraineers! The theme of the anthology may be weird camouflage horror, but we here at MMP HQ are up-front about our intent with Monstrous Outlines… we expect you’ll love it. More to come, so stay connected with Martian Migraine Press on Twitter and Facebook.

Open Submissions Call — Monstrous Outlines anthology

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Martian Migraine Press is now open to submissions for our 2019 anthology project…

“Their hand is at your throats, yet ye see Them not;
and Their habitation is even one with your guarded threshold.”
— H. P. Lovecraft, The Dunwich Horror

Monstrous Outlines will be an anthology of horror and weird fiction with a focus on the theme of camouflage: people, entities, monsters, gods, even concepts, that masquerade as things other than themselves. Predators in plain sight, deities on their down time, sublime extra-dimensional terrors slumming in 4D. We want to see stories of exceptionally well done camouflage, all the more baffling and frightening for its seamless nature. We want to see stories of seeming where the hidden thing is poorly hidden for a number of reasons: perhaps there are layers to its camouflage, or perhaps it doesn’t care how well it hides. Imagine the moment when the perfectly hidden thing reveals itself. When the poorly hidden thing reveals itself. We’re also interested in duplicates, doppelgangers, and shapeshifters. Think John W. Campbell’s Who Goes There? and its cinematic offspring, The Thing, for the latter. The seed story for this anthology will be Algernon Blackwood’s classic tale, The Willows, a story of two worlds touching, of men meeting the unnameable through the medium of the nearest natural analogue, the titular willow trees.

Submission period closes 31 NOVEMBER 2018. The anthology will be released in trade paperback and electronic book formats in early March 2019.

SUBMISSIONS GUIDELINES may be found here

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